Tag Archives: City of Port Phillip

DEMOLITION DERBY

By ROBERTO CHUTER

As a follow up to my last article, “Threatening A House With A History“, there have been some fearful updates not to mention a potential demolition derby. The developer Nick McKimm’s representative recently requested an adjournment at VCAT to represent amendments for the development of 1-5 Tiuna Grove, Elwood into a monolith of 19 apartments. So, apparently to stay within the guidelines of No. 3 and No. 5’s interim heritage overlay the new plans are to be presented at VCAT later this year.

The plans are as equally horrible as the previous ones. Perhaps worse. The development proposes retaining the facades and the front two rooms of each house demolishing the rest and replacing with smaller footprint double storey additions. There is then a massive building which wraps around the two properties on the left and rear. “This monstrosity has no relationship to the surrounding environment. May as well stick a skyscraper in!” wrote a Tiuna Grove resident and St. Kilda artist Josie Wadelton stated “These Heritage sites must be preserved at all costs.” “Elwood needs to be able to breathe – there is no air left with over-population of apartments and too little regard of local residents. The scale of development utterly inappropriate to neighbourhood,” stated another local.

Now, you would expect that VCAT, the City of Port Phillip and the developers, knowing that there are now 2,300 (and climbing) signatures on the petition against this development, surely there is a realisation that the residents and the wider community do not want this development in their community. Why aren’t they listening? The residents and the community , I repeat, do not want this disaster to occur in their community. It’s a pretty clear message.

“As a resident of Elwood, just a few streets from this development, I’m gobsmacked that such a monolithic, monstrous building that lacks any empathy for neighbourhood character and impact on its surrounding residents, buildings and streets would even be considered…” stated another longtime local with a firm passion.

Is it just all about developers’ profit and greed? If so, haven’t they stuffed their wallets enough already in Elwood. So many beautiful and unique dwellings vanishing virtually overnight.

And what about the historical and cultural significance of these properties, in particular No. 3? Facades will suffice? Really? I think not. Aesthetically, these two beautiful homes are excellent examples of post First World War in the bungalow’s style and are of great value to the Heritage of Elwood and the greater City of Port Phillip and for future generations. Minor changes have occurred to both of these two homes but these are relatively small and reversible, and have not impacted upon their importance and significance whatsoever.

“‘Heritage’ is what you end up with AFTER you save anything that is historic and that is building, streets-cape and trees.” wrote an objectioner.

In particular, the destruction of the rest of the No. 3 dwelling conflicts with the Heritage requirements surely? The former dining room, has always been known as ‘The Red Room” since the early 20s, it has been painted over white during the intervening years but was faithfully restored to its original colour in the mid-90s under the then lessee, well-known playwright Julia Britton. It has now recently been repainted over again (yes, in white), most likely to make it more conservative and/or more saleable to buyers by recent owners. This precious room has nurtured, created and played host to many historical and cultural events over the last hundred years. Too numerous to mention. From discussions about the current political scene, war, to art and painting, to theatre, to filmmaking and radio, to poetry and was a room that magically inspired and bore many famous stage plays, films, music and art throughout the 90s and 00s. It became a legendary room amongst the Melbourne artistic community. Designed beautifully by the architects Richardson & Wood in c. 1912 (dates vary to 1917) in a mock Tudor style highlighted with wooden beams and stunning panelling, this room needs to be preserved.

At the exterior, ajoing The Red Room’s large bay window, it features an authentic verandah in which the famous artist Mirka Mora and Britton once sat together, one afternoon, in blue deck chairs, nibbling green grapes and sipping from small bottles of soda water. Many years later the legendary La Mama Theatre staged an extraordinary open air theatre production entitled “The Murderer’s Barbeque” in the rear garden of No. 3 for the Elwood residents and the general public to see. And did they see. The seven performances were entirely packed out – even during a thunderstorm and downpour one particular evening. The production garnered a number of award nominations for its actor and its genesis at No. 3. This authentic, untouched Australian back garden/yard, its ancient Canary Palm tree and verandah is proposed to be ravaged, the old tree relocated.

Locals JT of Elwood said “The destruction of both these valuable houses must be should be totally protected. What is the Port Phillip council doing?” Karen Boyle added “The minute the neighbours see demolition vehicles approaching put the word out… there will be many happy to protest with a chain, padlock and a muesli bar to keep us going as long as it takes!” and lastly Sonny Day remarked “(A) beautiful house. If all else fails we chain ourselves to the front.”

The final hearing for this inappropriate development is scheduled at VCAT for 7 days from 2-10 December. Please have your say and help rescue part of our precious and vanishing heritage. It is simple to object but it is urgent, so go to the link below and submit. Hopefully, future generations can stroll down Tiuna Grove, past these two wonderful properties and say: “Thank God, they saved these beautiful homes”. We do need to save Elwood for over development, especially in one of Elwood’s most historical streets, Tiuna Grove.

A HOUSE WITH A HISTORY

By ROBERTO CHUTER

There are many houses with histories. But this particular house has more than most. Located in one of Elwood’s most historical streets, Tiuna Grove, No. 3 does not possess a heritage overlay to save it from destruction by profiteering developers. Why? No one knows why, including the City of Port Phillip. Mayor Dick Gross, admitted that it seems that it was a mistake not to include these properties in the heritage overlay in the first place. What are the Port Phillip Heritage Review doing? In 2009, Tiuna Grove and Elwood residents battled for months to save the house from demolition because developers attempted to remove the original 100 year old covenant that was in place. Fortunately, the residents and the community were successful.

Built in 1912 on land owned by Liet. Col. Harry McLeod Duigan formerly of the Australian Imperial Forces (with a distinguished military career and noted athlete), the house is legendary for its historical and cultural significance. The beautiful dwelling is a rare example of a Federation home which retains virtually all of its original interior fittings and red brick structure. In particular is the famous ‘The Red Room’ (original dining room) which still boasts of its stunning floor to high ceiling Tudor-style timber panelling and leadlight bay windows. Many artistic and lively events have taken place in ‘The Red Room’.

Flashing back to 1921, the then owner allowed Leslie Taylor, known as Squizzy Taylor, to hide out in the back room of the house after fleeing, disguised as a school boy in a Scotch College uniform, from 60-66 Glenhuntly Road, Elwood. In 1923, Chas. Miller and Edgar Clarke sold No. 3 for 2950 pounds to a large attendance and bidding was spirited. Liet. John (Jack) Frank and his wife Frances lived at No. 3 in 1944, Sadly, on 22nd June, Jack was killed.

The house became a share house in the 1980s then in 1994, the famous Australian playwright, Julia Britton, then aged 89, leased the property. Britton wrote 14 or more of her successful plays in the house, many of the produced nationally and internationally.

From 1994-2016, No. 3 became a much talked about cultural hub under Britton’s tenancy. Fifteen play and screenplay readings were read and presented in ‘The Red Room’ with many personalities of the time involved along with endless rehearsals for acclaimed and award-winning stage productions such as “The Death of Peter Pan”, “The Object of Desire”, “Half A Person” and “Homme Fatale.”

In 2001, the famous La Mama Theatre in Carlton staged an open-air season of “The Murderer’s Barbeque” for the Port Phillip community in the back garden of the property. The production was nominated for some awards and local residents packed out the performances to capacity. No. 3 was on a roll when a number of feature and short films were filmed in the house and the gardens. These included the internationally acclaimed “The Dream Children” (also penned by Britton), “Come Said The Boy”, the horror film “Swallow” and the Screen Australia documentary entitled: “Fearless” about the life of Britton also featuring the house. The documentary aired on ABC-TV, cable channels and worldwide networks. No. 3 welcomed many overseas visitors from Greece, England, the U.S. and Germany eager to meet Britton and visit the house.

No. 3 has also had a long association with the National Trust of Victoria’s properties such as Rippon Lea from 1990-2001, producing and creating site-specific performances from the front room of the house. These highly acclaimed productions included: “Loving Friends”, “The Great Gatsby”, “Anne of Green Gables” and the highly controversial adaptation of “Lady Chatterley’s Lover.” Manyfamousandinfamouspersonalitiesthathavelived,stayedorbeenassociatedwith No. 3 including: Mirka Mora (artist), Paul Cox (filmmaker), Clifford Frith (artist), John Clarke (TV Sat, Bryan Dawe, Jane Turner (actors), Nicholas Denton (actor), Barry Lowe (playwright), Heather Ellyard (artist), Andrew Domink (filmmaker), Manu Bennett (actor), Graeme Squires (actor), Gerry Sont (actor), Wayne Groom (filmmaker), John Ruane (filmmaker), Maestro Richard Dival, Anthony Breslin (artist), Kate Llewellyn (novelist), Sarah Roberts (actress), Mark Lee (actor), John Muirhead (ABC-TV producer), Chris Young (musician), Sam Mallet (composer), Ronald Woodcock (violinist), Kerri Simpson (singer), Kevin Stanton (musician/composer, Paul O’Brien (actor), Albert Tucker (artist), Dr. Michael Kozminski, Dr. Lisa Dethridge, Dr. George Mucknicki, Simon Barley (sculptor), Jacqui Henshaw (photographer), Peter Leiss (photographer) and many, many more.

With the death of Britton in 2012 and after a large memorial and marquee in the back garden the house was auctioned off in 2016 in front of a massive amount of onlookers and potential

buyers. Surprisingly, prior to this auction the owner destroyed the 100+ year old gum tree (for no apparent reason) that stood in the right hand corner of the front garden homing much birdlife. How did Council allow this to happen? Residents were infuriated. The back garden also suffered some significant loss. Originally three large 100+ palm trees highlighted the garden, (apparently in honour of fallen soldiers) two vanished over time, and only one stands today, its existence now threatened.

At present the house (and the next door dwelling No. 5) is once again under threat by greedy developers seeking to consolidate the large properties and replace them with a single building of oppressive monolith consisting of 19 apartments. Fortunately, the Minister for Planning in the Victorian State Government has granted interim heritage protection for No. 3 and 5 as requested by the Port Phillip Council. This interim protection will last until the 30th June 2020 which gives Council time to put in place permanent heritage plans. Which is about time! The developers requested an adjournment of the VCAT hearing so necessary preparations could be made. VCAT (and we all know what VCAT is like) granted it. The final hearing is scheduled over 7 days from 2-10 of December.

The developers said the demolition of the properties will not proceed until the permit is in place. But on the morning of July 10, five or six workers arrived at the site and started digging up parts of the grove to disconnect gas lines to the properties preparing for demolition next month.

“It wouldn’t surprise me if we showed up tomorrow and the bulldozers were here to knock it over,” stated one of the residents. Developer Mr. Nick McKimm expressed that the workers had disconnected the gas and power at the site as a safety precaution and was adamant the houses would not be demolished yet saying: “There will be absolutely nothing more done at the site until we have the proper permits.”

No. 3 Tiuna Grove, Elwood is an important and essential component to the City of Port Phillip’s historical and cultural identity and should be classified and preserved at all costs as a Heritage property. What heritage property does the City of Port Phillip possess that is crucial to the education and enjoyment for our children and future generations?

Beachside Stories **** Open Media review

Gasworks Arts Park and Melbourne Writers’ Theatre present

Beachside Stories – 13 – 22 June 2019

Review & images by Kerrie Pacholli for Open Media Australia

Rating

****

Selling out fast! Link to bookings : Beachside Stories

Dick Gross & Alex Gilbert image © PationPics

Dick Gross & Alec Gilbert

 

The ghost of Dick Gross (played by Dick Gross, Mayor, City of Port Phillip) shares the stage with actor Alec Gilbert who actually plays Dick Gross. Both Dick Grosses engage in a robust conversation about his life in public office, his fears of past failures, frustrations, love of family and his hopes, dreams and aspirations for the future.

Beachside Stories is described as a series of duologues  by Clare Mendes, Producer and Company Manager of Melbourne Writers Theatre; commissioned by Gasworks to create, write and produce this highly entertaining window into the lives, loves, successes and vulnerabilities of five extra ordinary local community Stars.

Carolie Ling & Emma Cox image © PationPics

Coralie Ling & Emma Cox

Rev. Coralie Ling joins the stage with her much younger resonation in Emma Cox.   We learn about Coralie’s relentless and successful battles with the establishment regarding her ambitions in becoming the first women to be ordained as a minister in the Methodist Church in 1969.

Giovanni Piccolo & Peter Logan image © PationPics

Giovanni Piccolo & Peter Logan

We find out about the struggles that community activist Peter Logan has endured since 1996 with regards to Save Albert Park group along with proven deceptions by the Grand Prix and government officials.

Karissa Taylor & Melisand Box image © PationPics

Karissa Taylor & Melisand Box

15-year-old Albert Park College student Melisand Box (right) totally embraces the opportunity to show us just how talented, ambitious and naturally confident she is in her role as a conniving savant surgeon who operates on American actress, and her personal idol, Ann Hathaway played by Karissa Taylor.

Sarah Hamilton & Tony Adams playing Tony Manago © PationPics_6337

Sarah Hamilton & Tony Adams

Last but definitely not least was the touching story of Tony Manago played by Sarah Hamilton & Tony Adams. Known as the ‘ The Singing Butcher’ of South Melbourne Market. Tony’s life took an amazing turn at age 38 when he was approached by an Italian maestro whilst, singing at the market, to eventually become a professional Opera singer touring Rome and Sicily.

Tony Manago image © John Edwards

Tony Manago image © John Edwards

The grand finale sees the real Tony Manago singing an Italian Opera, Pavarotti style.

Elizabeth Walley, Resident Director at Melbourne Writers Theatre directed this collaboration which features plays written by five MWT writers who first interviewed and then wrote scripts for the Local Stars: Bruce Shearer for ‘Only Ghosts Can Second-Guess’ (Uncovering Dick Gross); Clare Mendes ‘Rhapsody in Purple’ (Pondering Coralie Ling); Alison Knight ‘Logan’s Run’ (Reliving Peter Logan); Brooke Fairley ‘The True Imaginings of Melisand Box’ (Exploring Melisand Box); and Adele Shelley ‘The Singing Butcher’ (Celebrating Tony Manago).

Beachside  Stories is a heartwarming and entertaining showcase about real community activists; their loves, ambitions, desires, insecurities and courage.

 

Salvatori’s Vortex of Time exhibition

produced by Kerrie Pacholli © pationpic,com
filmed and edited by Andre Le Coz © andrelecoz.com

Enjoy this glimpse of Vortex of Time exhibition currently on view at Carlisle Street Art Space 99a Carlisle Street St Kilda 24 Oct – 21 Nov 2018. Featured is an amazing body of works by St Kilda based artist Salvatori Lolicato.

Ryan New, Danielle von der Borch, Harriet Devlin Image Paul Dunn

SONG FOR A WEARY THROAT review

Review Marian Webb

Ryan New, Danielle von der Borch, Harriet Devlin Image Paul Dunn

Ryan New, Danielle von der Borch, Harriet Devlin Image by Paul Dunn

SONG FOR A WEARY THROAT at the Fairfax Studio takes pride of place at the Melbourne International Arts Festival after its much-acclaimed premier at Theatreworks last year.  Directed by Kate Sulan, Rawcus Ensemble – fifteen performers with and without disability – join the Invenio Singers in a profoundly moving work of theatre.

Set in an abandoned dance-hall littered with disused carpet rolls, a destroyed cinema pew, dust and other detritus, the action begins as a performer chalks the first lines of Dante’s Inferno on a disappearing blackboard before brilliant light, loud noise, then darkness simulate a cataclysm that breaks down consensus narrative structure. The ensemble performs wordlessly, forming tableaux, shifting the furniture and reforming into choric dance routines and dramatic interpersonal events that slide from one to another like a mind rebuilding itself after disaster.

Prue Stevenson, Joshua Lynzaat Image -Sarah Walker

Prue Stevenson, Joshua Lynzaat Image by Sarah Walker

Aided by the Fairfax Studio’s superb acoustics, the accompanying soundtrack by Jethro Woodward and Gian Slater ranges through a low drone of scratched vinyl to explosion, rhythmic dance and sublime harmony. The Invenio Singers add their clear-voiced, wordless songs, at one point making a melody using only breath into hand-held mics. The performers each bring unique qualities to the ensemble, dressed in mostly casual attire that links everyday personality to stage persona.

Harriet Devlin, Ryan New, Rachel Edward, Mike McEvoy, Paul Mately, Michael Buxton, Danielle von der Borch-Image Paul Dunn

Harriet Devlin, Ryan New, Rachel Edward, Mike McEvoy, Paul Mately, Michael Buxton, Danielle von der Borch image by Paul Dunn

SONG FOR A WEARY THROAT is theatre liberated from text, broken into its elements and reconstituted into a stunning, immersive experience. Don’t miss it.

Created by the Rawcus ensemble of performers with and without disability

10 – 12 October | 7:30pm
13 October | 2:00pm & 7:30pm
14 October | 5:00pm
Duration: 65 minutes (without interval)
Arts Centre Melbourne, Fairfax Studio
Book at artscentremelbourne.com.au or 1300 182 183

proudly supported by:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

produced by Kerrie Pacholli © pationpics.com

 

 

 

 

20th Anniversary of Shakespeare Grove Artist Studios

Meet the Artists – St Kilda Art Crawl launch 21, 22 & 23 Sept. 2017

Re-inventing LIFE through ART, an ongoing therapy.

Silent intelligence, each soul’s higher self, speaks of a collective, a whole; the human race as one. In our hearts we all know this to be true, one only needs to apply thought. Pressure in the frontal lobe region may follow as a result, tension will subside with gradual use of the minds eye.

If you’re in disagreement I invite you to come along and allow the artists involved to persuade you of another outlook, or more accurately in-look. An in-look which becomes an outlook of the soul. Push the envelope and watch it bend, be like the reed in the wind, the one Confucius spoke of. The Hidden runs our lives, for most of us have no idea of our purpose of existance. Most of us hide behind invisible mask of our choosing.

Man is a walking talking paradox, who’s hypocritical abilities are of legendary status. At this point in humanity’s evolution I believe it is important to pause and take stock of one’s true purpose, lights, gifts and shadows truths. Together they provide the human halone with a third dimensional experience, according to information (thoughts) available.

Seems to me, one’s thoughts and intent should take precedence above all.

 
by Marko Maglaic – Australian collectable artist

Fitzroy Street Art Walk

Pamella Dion painter contribution in Fitzroy Street installation as part of the St Kilda Art Crawl

Pamella Dias – Lotus Arts a contributor in Fitzroy Street installation as part of the St Kilda Art Crawl

Dino Damiani exhibition in Fitzroy St. precinct as part of the St Kilda Art Crawl

Dino Damiani exhibition in Fitzroy St. precinct as part of the St Kilda Art Crawl

Clare Austin exhibition in Fitzroy St. precinct as part of the St Kilda Art Crawl

Clare Austin exhibition in Fitzroy St. precinct as part of the St Kilda Art Crawl

 

Symmetry’s Shadow Exhibition

Anthony Breslin contributing painter at Symmetry's Shadow Exhibition opening on 22 & 23 Sept 2017 sponsored by St Kilda Art Crawl

Anthony Breslin contributing painter at Symmetry’s Shadow Exhibition opening on 22 & 23 Sept 2017 sponsored by St Kilda Art Crawl

Location: Christ Church St Kilda (Anglican), 14 Acland st. St Kilda

We would like you to meet some of Melbourne’s artistic community that are participating at various installations around the five St Kilda Art Crawl preccints.

Woodman contributing painter at Symmetry's Shadow Exhibition opening on 22 & 23 Sept 2017 sponsored by St Kilda Art Crawl

Phil Voodoo Woodman contributing painter at Symmetry’s Shadow Exhibition opening on 22 & 23 Sept 2017 sponsored by St Kilda Art Crawl

Jackie Ralph contributing artist at Symmetry's Shadow Exhibition 22, 23 Sept sponsored by St Kilda Art Crawl 2017

Jackie Ralph contributing artist at Symmetry’s Shadow Exhibition 22, 23 Sept sponsored by St Kilda Art Crawl 2017

Andrew Hustwaite contributing arts at Symmetry's Shadow Exhibition opening on 22 & 23 Sept 2017 sponsored by St Kilda Art Crawl

Andrew Hustwaite contributing arts at Symmetry’s Shadow Exhibition opening on 22 & 23 Sept 2017 sponsored by St Kilda Art Crawl

Marko Maglaic curator and contributing artits at Symmetry's Shadow Exhibition opening on 22 & 23 Sept 2017 sponsored by St Kilda Art Crawl

Marko Maglaic curator and contributing artits at Symmetry’s Shadow Exhibition opening on 22 & 23 Sept 2017 sponsored by St Kilda Art Crawl

Cal the Stoner contributing sculpture at Symmetry's Shadow Exhibition opening on 22 & 23 Sept 2017 sponsored by St Kilda Art Crawl

Cal the Stoner contributing sculpture at Symmetry’s Shadow Exhibition opening on 22 & 23 Sept 2017 sponsored by St Kilda Art Crawl

Michael Blamey contributing photographer at Symmetry's Shadow Exhibition opening on 22 & 23 Sept 2017 sponsored by St Kilda Art Crawl

Michael Blamey contributing photographer at Symmetry’s Shadow Exhibition opening on 22 & 23 Sept 2017 sponsored by St Kilda Art Crawl

Emmanuel Santos contributing photographer at Symmetry’s Shadow Exhibition opening on 22 & 23 Sept 2017 sponsored by St Kilda Art Crawl

Emmanuel Santos contributing photographer at Symmetry’s Shadow Exhibition opening on 22 & 23 Sept 2017 sponsored by St Kilda Art Crawl

 

 

Apu - Melbourne based Global Musician contributing musician at Symmetry's Shadow Exhibition opening on 22 & 23 Sept 2017 sponsored by St Kilda Art Crawl

Apu – Melbourne based Global Musician contributing musician at Symmetry’s Shadow Exhibition opening on 22 & 23 Sept 2017 sponsored by St Kilda Art Crawl

Martin Foley urging Victorians to get behind The St Kilda Art Crawl 2017

Martin Foley Minister for the Arts in the Daniel Andrews’  State Labor Government speaking about the enormous potential for the Port Phillip precinct assigned to The St Kilda Art Crawl to be launched on the 21, 22 & 23 of September 2017.

Martin Foley Minister for the Arts in the Daniel Andrews State Government with the driving creatives propelling St Kilda Art Crawl, Simon Barnett and Mick Pacholli

Martin Foley Minister for the Arts in the Daniel Andrews State Government with Simon Barnett, Mick Pacholli and Tim Barnett from the St Kilda Art Crawl..

 

SKAC is a non for profit community incentive spearheaded by passionate local St Kilda creatives who are determined to bring the artistic community along with it’s mojo back to St Kilda and the Port Phillip precinct.

Martin Foley Minister for the Arts in the Daniel Andrews State Government with the driving creatives propelling St Kilda Art Crawl, Simon Barnett and Mick Pacholli

Martin Foley Minister for the Arts in the Daniel Andrews State Government with Simon Barnett and Mick Pacholli; the driving force propelling The St Kilda Art Crawl.

 

 

 

film & post production by Simon and Tim Barnett Mynewsroom in association with pationpics.com Images by Kerrie Pacholli © pationpics.com