Tag Archives: Melbourne Art Centre

Ryan New, Danielle von der Borch, Harriet Devlin Image Paul Dunn

SONG FOR A WEARY THROAT review

Review Marian Webb

Ryan New, Danielle von der Borch, Harriet Devlin Image Paul Dunn

Ryan New, Danielle von der Borch, Harriet Devlin Image by Paul Dunn

SONG FOR A WEARY THROAT at the Fairfax Studio takes pride of place at the Melbourne International Arts Festival after its much-acclaimed premier at Theatreworks last year.  Directed by Kate Sulan, Rawcus Ensemble – fifteen performers with and without disability – join the Invenio Singers in a profoundly moving work of theatre.

Set in an abandoned dance-hall littered with disused carpet rolls, a destroyed cinema pew, dust and other detritus, the action begins as a performer chalks the first lines of Dante’s Inferno on a disappearing blackboard before brilliant light, loud noise, then darkness simulate a cataclysm that breaks down consensus narrative structure. The ensemble performs wordlessly, forming tableaux, shifting the furniture and reforming into choric dance routines and dramatic interpersonal events that slide from one to another like a mind rebuilding itself after disaster.

Prue Stevenson, Joshua Lynzaat Image -Sarah Walker

Prue Stevenson, Joshua Lynzaat Image by Sarah Walker

Aided by the Fairfax Studio’s superb acoustics, the accompanying soundtrack by Jethro Woodward and Gian Slater ranges through a low drone of scratched vinyl to explosion, rhythmic dance and sublime harmony. The Invenio Singers add their clear-voiced, wordless songs, at one point making a melody using only breath into hand-held mics. The performers each bring unique qualities to the ensemble, dressed in mostly casual attire that links everyday personality to stage persona.

Harriet Devlin, Ryan New, Rachel Edward, Mike McEvoy, Paul Mately, Michael Buxton, Danielle von der Borch-Image Paul Dunn

Harriet Devlin, Ryan New, Rachel Edward, Mike McEvoy, Paul Mately, Michael Buxton, Danielle von der Borch image by Paul Dunn

SONG FOR A WEARY THROAT is theatre liberated from text, broken into its elements and reconstituted into a stunning, immersive experience. Don’t miss it.

Created by the Rawcus ensemble of performers with and without disability

10 – 12 October | 7:30pm
13 October | 2:00pm & 7:30pm
14 October | 5:00pm
Duration: 65 minutes (without interval)
Arts Centre Melbourne, Fairfax Studio
Book at artscentremelbourne.com.au or 1300 182 183

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produced by Kerrie Pacholli © pationpics.com

 

 

 

 

Colin Hay at Playhouse Theatre

The stage is carefully set  with four guitars in stands facing the audience, a wooden coat rake and wooden stool with three bottles of water to quench Colin’s cultivated thirst during his performance.

Regarding Colin Hay performing in the Playhouse Theatre at the Melbourne Art Centre as part of The Melbourne International Comedy Festival 2014.  ‘It doesn’t get better than this’ quotes Pixie Michael, Melbourne based sound and lighting maestro who did his part in creating acoustic magic that night.

The best way to describe the effect that Colin’s incredible vocal and acoustic guitar performance had on me is to say that it felt like I had arrived  home.  To my senses Colin is centred, living in a magical place where his music and songs have lives and personalities of their own. Stories in song conjuring images that transport one to far off destinations and tapping into memories and awarenesses through time and space. It felt as if the entire audience were inclusively flying through space simultaneously having the same emotional experiences.

All the usual greats were given the stage including Who Can it be now, Down by the Sea and Land Down Under.

Between songs Colin shared witty stories of his life on the road throughout his robust 40 year career and delightful and poignant memories of his loving family; keeping it real and compelling with his adorable Scottish accent and crystal clear delivery.

Colin Hay is a much loved Aussie icon. Not bad for a Scotsman who lives in LA.